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Sunday, December 17, 2017

Portrait of a Turkey Vulture

The Turkey Vulture... not one of the prettiest bird species on planet Earth, but a species that plays a vital role as a scavenger. Vultures eat dead animals. That sounds gross, but it helps to stop the spread of disease as well as control feral animal populations.
Most people will only see this bird flying high in the air cruising within the hot thermals on a warm afternoon. They have been known to travel upwards to 200 miles a day in search of food using a highly developed keen sense of smell to guide them.


Friday, December 15, 2017

Leopard of the Masai Mara

Although the Lion may be King in Africa, it is the elusive and secretive Leopard that has always held my imagination. Traveling for days on end, from Mount Kenya to the north, to the Masai Mara triangle to the south, our safari team's searched non-stop to locate any signs of Leopard being present. On a few occasions, a fleeting image of one was spotted, only to disappear back into the dense underbrush like a "thief in the night". 

Leopards are very cunning felines with the strength to pull a carcass 3x their weight up a tree. They have mastered the art of stealth and can be within a mere few feet of their prey before they ever know they are there. 

As would be the case, on our last day on safari, a call came in that a Leopard had been spotted by another vehicle a few miles ahead walking within a tributary of the muddy Mara River. 

With great haste and a high sense of urgency, we put the vehicle in high gear and quickly headed toward the coordinates provided. Upon arrival, all of our vehicles converged and scoured the banks for some time before our elusive Leopard decided to pay us a special visit instead. Sitting beneath one of our safari vehicles, she sat for some time staring into the distance at what might be her next meal. She gave us no real notice and seemingly used the outline of our vehicles as a means of camouflage before moving on.

One cannot put into proper words the thrill of this moment, and how fortunate we were to see this amazing animal so up close and personal.






Thursday, December 14, 2017

Published Interview - VOYAGEDALLAS

An early Christmas gift to my little photography business via being interviewed in a local online magazine here in DFW called VOYAGEDALLAS. Click the link and enjoy reading my story:)

http://voyagedallas.com/interview/meet-dennis-stewart-natures-realm-wildlife-photography-fort-worth/

VoyageDallas Published Interview 2017

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Graceful Flight

A beautiful capture of a "Great Egret" effortless flying across a Texas waterway. The Great Egret or "Common Egret" as it is also known as, is a large bird species easily identified by its beautiful white plumage. It has four sub-species across the world, and it can be typically seen anywhere that there is water such as a lake, pond, river or creek. 

I took this image with a Nikon D810 camera body with a Tamron 150-600mm lens free-standing (No tripod).

Great Egret in Flight

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Today I am entering some of my favorite 2017 wildlife images into the Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the year competition. I have never entered this competition before, but as the saying goes, " you can't win if you don't play"!

ABOUT: Now in its fifty-third installment, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition provides a showcase for the world’s very best nature photography. The competition is owned by the world-renowned and trusted British institution, the Natural History Museum.

The Wildlife Photographer of the Year series consists of a major exhibition at the Museum and a worldwide tour. The winning images appear on this website and leading publications worldwide. As a result, the photographs are seen by millions.

Wish me Luck
Dennis




Monday, December 4, 2017

PATREON SUPPORT

All, I have recently updated my Patreon site seeking support from folks like you to assist me in taking my wildlife photography to that "next level".

For your convenience, I have added five levels of support each representing one of the "BIG FIVE" animals of Africa just for fun. The Elephant contributor is the highest support level you can choose, but whatever you decide is fine by me......and btw, some cool freebies are included!!!
For those unfamiliar with Patreon, there is a short tutorial within the overview once you click on the link.


Doe in a Thicket

I caught sight of a Doe in a thicket this morning across a meandering Texas waterway within the Fort Worth Nature Center. She blended in so well with her surroundings that I never actually saw her at first until I heard a rustling of leaves as she was scurrying about foraging for food.
The craggy look of the trees, roots, and brush combined with the reflection of the Doe in the water really makes this shot nice.
Happy Trails

Doe in a Thicket 

Friday, December 1, 2017

Lioness of Samburu


To see a Lion in the wild in Africa is an experience one cannot forget. Here a lioness prowls no more than 10' away from the safari vehicle I was so thankful to be surrounded by. 


 CLICK TO BUY




Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Fight for Elephants

The African Elephant...nothing is more synonymous with the continent of Africa than this majestic animal. From the sweeping grasslands of the Serengeti to the coarse sands of the Namib desert, the African Elephant has roamed here for countless millennia surviving against flood, famine, disease, and never-ending civil strife and war waged everywhere around them. 

Over the last century, hundreds of thousands of African Elephants have been illegally killed by poachers. Most of the large male "Tuskers", as they are more commonly known, have long since disappeared, their faces cut off, tusk removed, and their corpses left to rot in the harsh African sun. 

Back in the early part of the 20th century, there may have been as many as 3-5 million African elephants roaming across Africa. Today estimates are that there are only around 415,000 according to the World Wildlife Federation (WWF).

It is difficult to fathom that an amazing species such as this may someday disappear altogether from the African continent simply because of someone wanting to have a piece of jewelry or ornament made of ivory to adorn their mantlepiece. 

There is however continued hope, as more rigid laws are enacted and more resources are allocated to protect those elephants left standing and hopefully reverse this strategy of which mankind is 100% responsible for. 




Thursday, November 23, 2017

Cape Buffalo

Cape Buffalo are quite simply intimidating and one of the most dangerous animals in Africa. No, they are not carnivores, but they do congregate in large herds with can weigh upwards of 1300 lbs. If threatened they will protect themselves very ferociously even against Lions. 

The Cape Buffalo is considered one of the "Big 5" animals of Africa, and are routinely and unfortunately sought out by trophy hunters where hunting is still allowed. 

Both images depicted were taken in Lake Nakuru, Kenya Africa this past year. 



 CAPE BUFFALO HERD
CAPE BUFFALO HERD


CAPE BUFFALO


Monday, November 20, 2017

"Sunrise on the Mara"

A serene landscape image I took in Kenya on the Massai Mara of which whispers in your head...what is out there in the fog waiting? Hmmmm......


Sunrise on the Mara

Nature is rarely for the faint of heart as is depicted by this closeup scene of two large male lions gorging themselves on a recent Zebra kill.


The Killing Field









Sunday, November 19, 2017

Giraffe Family Massai Mara

The Giraffe is now listed as a vulnerable species according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, the body that administers the world's official endangered species list.
Fortunately for me, I saw hundreds of Giraffes in Kenya including this large family of which passed by my camera lens in 2017. What a magnificent sight to see, and what an amazing animal species this truly is! I can only hope and pray that generations to come will continue to recognize the need to protect them and the many other species now deemed threatened or endangered on this earth.
Happy Trails....

GIRAFFE FAMILY

Saturday, November 18, 2017

AN OLD LION

In February of 2017, I traveled to Africa on a photographic safari with a dear friend of mine William (Bill) Newland. In July 2017, Bill sadly died...

Bill was a British American who absolutely loved nature, hiking and exploring our natural world. While in Africa, he never once complained and endured endless hours upon end on some of the roughest terrain imaginable. I never realized it at the time, but it was very likely that our African adventure was probably something on his "Bucket List".....although he never informed me of that fact outright, nor about how ill he probably was.

I am honored to have been able to spend time with my friend Bill during the last months of his life here on Earth and wish him Godspeed on the new journey he is now on. We will meet again someday...of that, there is no doubt.  






Friday, November 17, 2017

SAFARI HOME VIDEO

Just a quick video I put together of some of the amazing images taken on a recent safari to Africa earlier this year.  - Happy Trails!!!


Tuesday, November 14, 2017

AFRICAN SUNSET


The only man I envy is the man who has not yet been to Africa...for he has so much to look forward to! 




Monday, November 13, 2017

Great American Bison

Random images I have taken over time of the great American Bison. A magnificent animal of the old west of which I can now only imagine the thunderous herds of countless millions of which once roamed the vast grasslands of America....oh what a sight that must have been. - Happy Trails!







Sunday, November 12, 2017

BIG FIVE OF AFRICA

Many travel to Africa in hopes of seeing the "Big 5" animals of Africa as they have became known, but most come up way short in their quest unless they are extremely dedicated and willing to traverse great expanses of agonizing terrain in hopes of capturing even a fleeting image of one of these amazing animals in the wild.

The elusive Leopard is by far the most difficult of the five to spot, as they stay well camouflaged within the tall grasses and trees that mark their territory. The Black Rhino is as well very skittish of humans, as they have been hunted almost to extinction over the past 50 years, and although their eyesight is poor, their hearing and sense of smell are extremely good.

I was very fortunate to have great guides of which allowed me to locate and photograph each of these animals during my last safari. If you are interested in purchasing prints or novelties of any of these amazing "Big 5" images, I invite you to visit my website at www.naturesrealm.net where you can view them separately along with many other amazing images taken.




Saturday, November 11, 2017

SNOW GEESE 2017

Imagine the sound of thousands of wingbeats displacing the very air all around you as a large flock of Snow Geese take to the skies in a perfect harmony that simply dazzles the senses, and you will know how it felt to take this image.


Flock of Snow Geese
FLOCK OF SNOW GEESE 2017 - Copyright Dennis Stewart/Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography (c) 

Friday, November 10, 2017

BIG BUCK

A few early morning white-tailed deer came down to say hello to me as I meandered across their meadow. Always nice to see a buck with full antlers galore, although at times they can become quite territorial and aggressive, so I always make sure I keep my distance, especially in the rutting season. 




Thursday, November 9, 2017

Music to Work To

Nice Autumn day here in the great state of Texas with the sun shining and mild temperatures galore! Decided to do a little photo editing this afternoon, and nothing gets me in the mood better than listening to the likes of Frank Sinatra & Bobby Darin. Yep, I am a "man out of time", but would have it no other way!


Tuesday, November 7, 2017

IUNC REDLIST of Endangered Species

http://www.iucnredlist.org/

A very good source of information to learn about the species on this Earth of which are threatened and endangered due to a litany of potential causes worldwide.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Holiday Promotion 2017

Aerial Attack

When you think of Africa, you might typically think of the big predators as being the Lion, Leopard, Cheetah and Hyena. What you might not expect to experience would be a ferocious attack from above by a Martial Eagle swooping down and latching onto a baby gazelle being valiantly defended by the mother to no avail:(

The below series of images depicts this precise scene as it occurred on the vast plains of the Maasai Mara in Kenya Africa, and although I felt sad for this baby gazelle and especially for the mom, the saga of predator and prey is a continuing storyboard of which has played out countless times throughout our history, and represents the circle of life of which we all play a role.  

These images along with many others never seen are available for purchase at http://www.naturesrealm.net/








Sunday, November 5, 2017

FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM



If you are a Instagram guru, you can now follow me as I meander about in search of that next great wildlife shot!





Wildlife Shooting Tips for the Newbie and Seasoned Professial

Since so many of my friends have inquired about my wildlife photography techniques, I thought it time to share what I have learned through much trial and error over the years. 
1. Don’t be afraid of your camera.
2. Be observant of your surroundings, nature is everywhere and an amazing moment could be right around the next bend in the road or even beneath your very own feet.
3. Always try to get as close to your subject matter as possible without disturbing their space.
4. Focus on the eyes if possible, as it brings life into the shot.
5. Focus on shooting “Animal behavior” or “Movement” as this tells a story without many words needing to be spoken.
6. Lighting is extremely important, as great moments (trust me I know) can be lost if the lighting is not right.
7. Composition is equally important. try not to always center your picture, especially if the surroundings add so much more interest to the overal image.
8. Although I believe any lens can take great wildlife shots, you do need to know the limits of your lens in relation to what you are shooting to effectively capture the moment.
9. Take LOTS of pictures and practice, practice, practice…..the good thing with digital cameras, you don’t have to worry about buying film anymore.
10. There are NO golden rules to wildlife photography….break them or abide by the…just have fun!