SYMPHONY OF NATURE

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

For the love of Dragonflies

Dragonflies have always interested me because they possess such amazing capabilities, especially from a sheer flying perspective. They are aerial acrobats/assassins that possess such great speed they can readily catch their prey in mid-air faster than a blink of the eye. For years I have attempted to capture a picture of this behavior, but unfortunately they are quicker than me at present, and I mostly have to suffice with still closeup shots of them staring intently into my lens.

Dragonflies are very good insects to have around, so next time you see one, take a  brief moment to observe them and appreciate how spectacular they truly are.







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For special digital licensing purposes, please contact me directly for quotes at dstew42@gmail.com or call me direct at 817-682-5528.

All images and writing are copyright © Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography All Rights Reserved. Copying, altering, displaying or redistribution of any of these images without written permission from the artist is strictly prohibited

Friday, June 12, 2015

Great Egrets Fishing

This year, I have decided to augment my wildlife photography with quick video clips as well. This is a new medium for me; hence keeping them short and sweet at present until I can master the art of video editing. Hopefully by adding this into my arsenal of skills, you will get a better feel of the moment I am attempting to capture through my photography. 

In this little snippet of digital wonderment you will see several Great Egrets residing in a very fast flowing stream attempting to catch any little morsel of which would be unfortunate enough to wander into their field of vision.

Egrets and Herons have excellent eyesight and once something comes into their view, the likelihood of escape is low.

video




Thursday, June 11, 2015

Thursday Flashback Image - Red-Eyed Tree Frog

In December of 2007, this image of a Red-Eyed Tree frog was selected by the editors of National Geographic to be worthy of the prestigious "Daily Dozen" selection. This was the first of many images of which I have since been honored to have been selected, but it will forever hold a special place in my heart as there is nothing more satisfying than seeing a brief spectacular moment in time that you witnessed, prominently displayed for all to see and enjoy as well.

This image was taken in Costa Rica in 2007 with my Nikon D100 camera, and although the digital quality is nowhere near what I can produce today, I still receive a lot of positive feedback on this image, and that is something I am truly appreciative of.





Tuesday, June 9, 2015

American Alligator

To be a good wildlife photography you have to get up early (my biggest nemesis), willing to go out in all type weather conditions, and go where most sane people won't thread. That said, after an afternoon of slogging my way through mosquito infested swamp water in 90 degree heat, I was rewarded in spotting this American Alligator (#1 Pic) half submerged and very aware of my approach. Very stealthily, I adjusted my lens and was able to take several shots before he decided to end our photoshoot abruptly.

The second image was taken a week ago or so very near the same place I took the first.




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For special digital licensing purposes, please contact me directly for quotes at dstew42@gmail.com or call me direct at 817-682-5528.

All images and writing are copyright © Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography All Rights Reserved. Copying, altering, displaying or redistribution of any of these images without written permission from the artist is strictly prohibited


Monday, June 8, 2015

Great Blue Rookery

Last week I stumbled upon a cool "Great Blue Heron" rookery as I was meandering about observing the swollen and fast flowing Trinity river here in north Texas. Spring rains have caused widespread flooding the likes that have not been seen in many years in these parts, and I simply wanted to see it firsthand before the waters abated and returned to their normal levels.

As I was approaching the river's edge, I started to faintly hear the distinctive sounds of birds whereas at first glance eluded my vision, until... I noticed a large seemingly dead tree way across the river that was adorned with young Great Blue Herons making a lot of noise in the process. I quickly surmised this was a rookery and although the distance probably exceeded what I would normally attempt to take a picture of with my 600mm camera lens, I decided capturing the moment was at the very least worth the attempt.

The midday temperature was hovering in the 90's (Fahrenheit), and the sun was high in the sky of which did offer me some advantage from a lighting perspective to pick up of some of the finer details I would otherwise lose. I have not yet processed all the shots taken, but here is a glimpse of a couple of images I have worked on of which to give you a sense of the scene I was privileged to see.

Great Blue Rookery 3


Great Blue Rookery 1

Great Blue Rookery 2

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For special digital licensing purposes, please contact me directly for quotes at dstew42@gmail.com or call me direct at 817-682-5528.

All images and writing are copyright © Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography All Rights Reserved. Copying, altering, displaying or redistribution of any of these images without written permission from the artist is strictly prohibited

Saturday, May 23, 2015

SURFACE LIGHT

Below is a B&W image I took this week of a Dwarf Crocodile. He is a very cool small crocodilian whereas I wanted to depict in dark tones to better emphasize his awesome texture without any other distraction from the subject-matter outside of a faint view of the surface of the water.

SURFACE LIGHT


Classification & Range -
The West African dwarf crocodile belongs to the family of crocodiles, Crocodylidae, which contains nearly all modern crocodilians (crocodile-like animals). The family Crocodylidae is divided into two subfamilies, Alligatorinae (alligators and caimans) and Crocodylinae (crocodiles). Dwarf crocodiles belong to the subfamily Crocodylinae. The dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis) is itself divided into two subspecies: The Congo dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis osborni) and the West African dwarf crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis tetraspis). The West African dwarf crocodile has a knob on its snout which distinguishes it from its Congolese cousin.

Habitat -
West African dwarf crocodiles live in smaller bodies of water (ponds, creeks, backwaters) throughout West Africa.

Length & Weight -
Books on crocodiles often say that dwarf crocodiles do not grow larger than about 5 feet (1.6 m) in length, but the male dwarf crocodile at Woodland Park is 6 feet, 3 inches (1.95 m) in length, and weighs 175 pounds (80 kg). Females tend to be much smaller, at only about 3-4 feet (.9-1.22 m) in length, and weigh far less than males. Our adult female weighs less than 40 pounds (18 kg).

Lifespan -
50-100 years (estimate).

Diet -
In the wild:Mainly fish, but also frogs, birds, small mammals. At the zoo: Rats, mice, fish. Crocodiles often snap at things that splash near their heads. In this way, they easily catch their lunch in the form of a jumping frog, fish or bird that has selected a poor place to land. When zoo visitors throw coins at crocodilians, the animals may snap at and swallow the coins, and become ill.

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For special digital licensing purposes, please contact me directly for quotes at dstew42@gmail.com or call me direct at 817-682-5528.

All images and writing are copyright © Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography All Rights Reserved. Copying, altering, displaying or redistribution of any of these images without written permission from the artist is strictly prohibited





Friday, May 22, 2015

Balancing Act

I cannot imagine a world where birds such as this beautiful Flamingo simply do not exist. They are such exquisite creatures to behold, that I often find myself mesmerized by their sheer elegance and balance of which they readily display.

This particular image was taken in a zoological park nearby me on a very inclement afternoon this week. I often practice my wildlife photography skills here to improve upon both my observation and technical skills of seeing and taking great images of nature.

This Flamingo was standing alone in a shadowy back-area of her enclosure, seemingly trying to avoid the constant stare of onlookers as they passed through the exhibit. I knew if I could get the shot, that the final result would be spectacular....and I believe I was correct!


Balancing Act

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For special digital licensing purposes, please contact me directly for quotes at dstew42@gmail.com or call me direct at 817-682-5528.

All images and writing are copyright © Nature's Realm Wildlife Photography All Rights Reserved. Copying, altering, displaying or redistribution of any of these images without written permission from the artist is strictly prohibited